Behaviour Never Lies #life #race

credit and found at: http://www.hypeorlando.com/growing-up-millennial/2014/06/01/three-things-maya-angelou-taught-me/

It has become a wild and crazy world.

Where hateful words, malicious behavior and utter foolishness have somehow become commonplace, tolerated and accepted.

Where a mélange of power and ignorance can have a sickening ripple effect on the rest of the world.

Where the covert underbelly sits back and nourishes themselves on the chaos and dark energy.

But the fact remains that behaviour never lies.

And no amount of power and expensively purchased education can outweigh intelligence, love for others and class.

M  xoxo

Advertisements

“If They Take Dogs and Jews, They’ll Probably Take You…” #fiction #race #holidayshortfiction

*Christmas-flavored short fiction*

It hadn’t dawned on me to warn landlords that we were Black but I guess that I should have…

Inspired by a true event…

Montreal, 1963.

“Sorry, we do have apartments for rent but we can’t risk having other tenants move out if you move in.”

I stood there with the baby sleeping in my arms while my other son peeked out from behind my skirt. He gave the middle-aged woman the same blank look that I was giving her. My husband was registering at the university so we were on our own to apartment hunt that day. It was cold and the excitement of witnessing my first snowfall was long gone.

This was the third visit we had made in response to For Rent ads and it would be the third time we were turned away. It hadn’t dawned on me to warn landlords that we were Black but I guess that I should have – it would have saved my time and my little one’s feet in this eye-opening cold.

Three times was not a charm.

Seeing the look of despair on my face, the woman tried to be helpful.

“Why don’t you try the building across the street, dear? They always have availability. If they take dogs and Jews, they’ll probably take you. Merry Christmas.”

And with that, the woman quietly shut her door.

©2017 Marquessa Matthews. All Rights Reserved.

Originally posted February 28, 2016, adapted in December 2017

“Most Black People Like Rap Music ” (2015) #race #blogger

Originally published on July 8, 2015

stupid-487043_1920

https://pixabay.com/en/stupid-dumb-thinking-brain-symbol-487043/

“What do you mean that you don’t like rap music?”

He sounds truly amazed at my statement.

I, on the other hand, am getting more and more annoyed with his small talk.

My friend’s neighbour is leaning on the frame of his door chatting me up because he has nothing better to do. I’m on my knees, trying to fix the lock on my friend’s door. It’s really hot, sweat is pouring down my back and the booming base of rap music blaring from the building next door is getting on my last nerve.

“Yup, that’s what I said. I don’t like rap music.”

My hand slips as I try to keep the lock balanced in place and everything, including my screwdriver, crashes to the floor.

“How can you not like rap? Have you looked at yourself in the mirror?”

I stop mid-reach to the items that had fallen.

Now, I can’t help myself and I look at him. I wipe the sweat from above my lip with my less-than clean hand.

Did he seriously just say that to me?

“What do you mean?” I need him to clarify before I decide what next to say.

“You’re Black and you don’t like rap? That’s pretty weird. Most Black people like rap.”

I feel my face getting hot and it’s not from the heat of the beautiful summer day. I see this conversation going in a number of different directions, most of them not good. And getting angry is at the top of my short list of options since I’m not in the greatest of moods.

But in looking at him, I can see that he genuinely believes what he is saying and isn’t being mean. And he isn’t trying to be stupid.

Well, at least not on purpose.

What is more surprising to me is that we are the same age and that he has such old-style stereotypical thinking. Then again, there is no age limit on the type of stereotypes a person can hold.

I choose to go a softer route, especially since his kids are home. I’d heard from my friend that his kids are so constantly confined to his apartment that the noone realized that children lived in the small building.

I pick up my screwdriver, determined to get the lock fixed so that I can escape the conversation. I put my focus back on the task at hand and talk as I do.

“Well, then I guess that I’m not most Black people. How many White friends do you have?”

“Uh, I don’t know. Lots.”

“Ok and out of all those White friends, how many of them like rap music?”

“Oh, lots of them do. But I personally hate it.”

“And how many Black friends do you have?”

He hesitates before answering. I can tell that he is not trying to stall with his answer, he’s just trying to count the number out in his head.

“I’d say 2 or 3.”

“Do they all like rap?”

“Uh, no.”

I try to remind myself that we all come from different backgrounds and experiences. The last thing I want to do is make him feel stupid. And I’m not interested in schooling anyone today so I choose my words carefully and decide to make a light joke out of it.

“In your circle, it sounds like your White friends like rap music more than your Black friends. So it sounds to me like you should be the one looking in the mirror.”

He cocks his head to one side, contemplating what I just said.

“That’s funny. You may be right.”

He seems to have caught the undercurrent of my message – if you are going to generalize, at least do it based on your own personal experience.

We hear a loud crash from inside his apartment and then crying. He turns to head inside.

Peace.

Finally.

But just before he closes his door, he turns to me.

“Are you sure that you don’t like rap music?”

It takes all my energy to mask my frustration.

Very sure.”

©2015 Marquessa Matthews. All Rights Reserved.

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Things Women Go Through #truestory

In response to “Recreate A Single Day”

scared

Photo credit: San Diego Shooter / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

When I felt his eyes on me, I immediately regretted having pushed my to-do list late into the evening hours.

With the change of seasons, it was already getting darker faster and in the badly-lit and bare parking lot, this dude was totally creeping me out. I hustled into the entrance of the hardware store as quickly as I could.

I’m usually aware of my surroundings so that’s how I noticed him almost right away. He had been staring at me as he had approached his car with one lonely bag in his hand. He had popped his trunk, thrown the bag into it and then continued staring. What creeped me out was the “something” in his eyes that I could see through the darkness. It gave me a sick ache in the pit of my stomach.

I was even more creeped out when he slammed his trunk and I realized that he was following behind me.

Strange how your brain processes information really fast when it needs to.

Why is he going back into the store when he just came from there? Is he following me? No, relax and stop being paranoid!

I joined the returns line near the main entrance and waited for what felt like an eternity before nonchalantly turning around to see where he had gone. Our eyes immediately made four. He was about 3 customers away from me in the same line.

What the f***? He’s got nothing in his hands to return…

For the first time in my life, I was glad that it was a long line. It gave me time to think.

Did I tell anyone about my errands and where I was going tonight? Should I call my brother and tell him where I am in case something were to happen? No, that might freak him out.

If I leave the line now, Weird Dude knows where I parked and could simply follow me back to my car…or even home. No, you can’t go straight back to your car.

It was my turn at the cashier. I handed her my bill and credit card and all the while, my thoughts were elsewhere. I looked back. Now, there were about four customers behind him.

As I placed my credit card back into my wallet, I played it cool and walked through the turnstile into the main part of the store. Stopping at the first aisle, I turned around to see that he was unsuccessfully trying to get himself out of the line, first from the back and then from the front. Other customers were getting annoyed with him trying to jostle past them.

I need to lose him. If I walk along the back aisles of the store, it would be easier to do it.

But as I did, I realized that with only one set of exit doors, he could be waiting there or even near my car. I immediately regretted wasting time and not going back directly to my car in the first place.

I called a friend who stayed on the line with me as we tried to decide on my next move.

And that’s when I decided to act like a creep myself.

I shadowed a man and his young son who was enjoying a lollipop headed in the same direction as my car. Fortunately, the man didn’t realize that I was invading their personal space but I was close enough for the child to eye me suspiciously as if I was about to steal the lollipop out of his hand.

Sorry kid, I’d rather be safe than sorry.

©2017 Marquessa Matthews. All Rights Reserved.

Originally posted on September 24, 2015

If you liked this piece and want to see more like it, please click on “Like” and/or “Comment” below and share with others who would also enjoy it. You can also sign up for my mailing list here to get the latest news from me. 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

“Are You Ready For Me To Speak?” | Snap Judgment #TryPod

There is one word that describes this 10 minute anecdote – RIVETING.

I actually stopped what I was doing, sat down to give it 100% of my attention because I was afraid of how her story would end.

I love Snap Judgment and as part of this March’s Podcast Awareness Month, why not check it out! You could also check out the other podcasts I listed in this Maybe You Like To Watch But I Prefer to Listen and Get Your Freak On .

Enjoy!

Disclaimer: I have no copyrights to the song and/or video and/or hyperlinks to songs and/or videos and/or gifs above. No copyright infringement intended.

Save

Save

#ShowcaseSunday: Fearfully Made – The Light Breaks Through #black #race @revheadpin

Absolutely wonderful and thought-provoking piece by Keith Haney!  Please be sure to visit and comment directly on Keith’s original post below.


Growing up black in America comes with a healthy dose of fear….

Source: Fearfully Made – The Light Breaks Through